Space, people, and the digital extensions of protest

An essay by Ola Hassanain. Ola zooms into the urbanscape of Khartoum under the recent revolution in Sudan and speculates on the role of social media platforms in the collective reimagining of space.

About Ola: Ola Hassanain’s videos, texts, performances and installation-based photographic work produces intriguing layered artwork that is informed by the cultural, political, and societal position of people in Khartoum, including her own experiences and her family’s diaspora. When her family scattered across the globe due to economic collapse in Sudan, her fascination with the ways the built environment reflects, responds to, and shapes the lives of those who inhabit it increased. Her most recent work explores the idea of “space as discourse,” an expanded notion of space that encompasses political and environmental questions. Hassanain’s honors include the University of Westminster’s Quintin Hogg Trust scholarship, a BAK–basis voor actuele kunst fellowship, and a Prince Claus Fund for Culture and Development grant. Hassanaian lives and works in Khartoum and Utrecht, and is currently a PhD candidate at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna.